The legend that was Mary Fields

She drank whiskey, swore often, and smoked handmade cigars. She wore pants under her skirt and a gun under her apron. At six feet tall and two hundred pounds, Mary Fields was an intimidating woman.

Mary lived in Montana, in a town called Cascade. She was a special member of the community there. All schools would close on her birthday, and though women were not allowed entry into saloons, she was given special permission by the mayor to come in anytime and to any saloon she liked.

Historical sepia-toned photograph of Mary Fields, an African American woman standing confidently with one hand resting on her hip and the other holding a rifle. She is dressed in a long-sleeved, full-length dress with a belted waist. Behind her is a backdrop with ornate patterns, suggesting an indoor setting.
Mary Fields

But Mary wasn’t from Montana. She was born into enslavement in Tennessee sometime in the early 1830s, and lived enslaved for more than thirty years until slavery was abolished. As a free woman, life led her first to Florida to work for a family and then Ohio when part of the family moved.

When Mary was 52, her close friend who lived in Montana became ill with pneumonia. Upon hearing the news, Mary dropped everything and came to nurse her friend back to health. Her friend soon recovered and Mary decided to stay in Montana settling in Cascade.

Her beginning in Cascade wasn’t smooth. To make ends meet, she first tried her hand at the restaurant business. She opened a restaurant, but she wasn’t much of a chef. And she was also too generous, never refusing to serve a customer who couldn’t pay. So the restaurant failed within a year.

But then in 1895, when in her sixties, Mary, or as “Stagecoach Mary” as she was sometimes called because she never missed a day of work, became the second woman and first African American to work as a mail carrier in the U.S. She got the job because she was the fastest applicant to hitch six horses.

Eventually she retired to a life of running a laundry business. And babysitting all the kids in town. And going to baseball games. And being friends with much of the townsfolk.

This was Mary Fields. A rebel, a legend.

Notes

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Click here to read a snapshot biography of another legend, Jim Thorpe.

“The legend that was Mary Fields” sources

Photograph of Mary taken circa 1895 – “Mary Fields.” Wikimedia Commons, Wikimedia Foundation, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mary_Fields.jpg

To cite

“The legend that was Mary Fields.” Published by Historical Snapshots. https://historicalsnaps.com/2018/02/17/legend-mary-fields/